The Importance of Correct Spectacles

Deteriorating eyesight is something that many of us have to deal with as age creeps up on us, and for many the idea of wearing glasses is not something we are overly happy about. Being seen wearing glasses when previously not needed can make us feel a little bit insecure, though there are some excellent fashions available today that are a far cry from the NHS specs we saw kids wearing forty years ago. It’s funny that most people are comfortable wearing a pair of sunglasses on a bright day, so why the hang up with normal glasses? It may be memories of when we were at school, when wearing glasses was a bit of a social stigma and kids who wore them were often laughed at and bullied, so poor eyesight often created additional problems for the wearer. Occasionally something comes along that has a more positive effect, like the Harry Potter character, although even then his persona is to a degree, that of a bit of a nerd. The stigma relating to glasses, explains why many people decide to opt for contact lenses, corrective surgery, or even worse, decide to try to do without them altogether.

Choosing your Glasses

Now while your optometrist will decide what lenses you need, it is now down to you to pick out the style that they will fit into, and the process is a little more complicated than you might think, especially if you want them to look good. You may see a really stylish pair of glasses that look absolutely awesome in the shop display, that somehow look totally wrong when you try them on. Actually the shape of your face is one of the biggest factors in finding the right look, along with skin tone and hair colour adding to the fun. Good manufacturers like Tom Ford spectacles understand this and provide many different shades of colour, styles and sizes, to make it easier to find the ones that look right.

Taking an Eyesight Test

Regular eyesight tests are strongly recommended, with at least every couple of years being considered about right. An eye test may well be able to pick up a developing issue that you were unaware of, including issues such as diabetes, or glaucoma, which can affect the eyes. There is a difference between a visual acuity test and a full eye test. A visual acuity is something we are all familiar with and involves us reading letters that gradually get smaller as we go down the list. Failure here, when our vision is worse than 20/40 will prompt a referral for a full eye test, which will tell you precisely what you level of vision is and if you need glasses to correct your sight. It is not only the eye itself, but also the area around them which is checked to look for any sign of injury, disease or abnormality. You will be provided with an optical statement that will tell you if you need glasses or not.

There are four key factors that come into play, being face shape, frame size, frame colour and frame details. Your local optician has lots of experience and can help you factor in the variables to help you choose well.